Past faculty

Edit Doron

Prof. Edit Doron

Generative linguisitcs track

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Edit Doron's research concerns the interface of semantics, morphology and syntax, particularly such topics as the Semitic verbal system, nominal predicates, the subject-predicate relation, resumptive pronouns, ergativity, ellipsis, free indirect discourse, habituality, the semantics of voice, definiteness, and reference to kinds. The main languages she has worked on are Hebrew (with special emphasis on the historical ties of Modern Hebrew to Classical Hebrew), Arabic, Aramaic, English and French.

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Gideon  Goldenberg

Prof. Gideon Goldenberg

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Born 1930, Tel Aviv; Ph.D. 1967, Hebrew University; (Tel Aviv Univ., 1965-1985); Prof. (HU) 1985; Emeritus 1998; Recipient, Israel Prize for Language Sciences, 1993; Member of the Israel Academy of Sciences and Humanities, since 1996; Corresponding Fellow of the British Academy, since 1999. Died 2013.

Research interests included comparative Semitic linguistics, linguistic typology, the history of linguistics thought, the grammatical traditions of Arabic, Syriac, Ethiopic and Hebrew as well as European traditions. In addition, he was a prominent expert in the Semitic languages and of Syriac.

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Olga  Kapeliuk

Prof. Olga Kapeliuk

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Born 1932, Krakow; Ph.D. 1969, Hebrew University; Lecturer 1970; Senior Lecturer 1972; Associate Professor 1981; Professor 1985; Emerita 1994; Recipient of the Israel Prize in General Linguistics 2005. Research interests include Semitic languages, especially Ethio-Semitic and Neo-Aramaic, as well as synchronic and diachronic syntax and language interference.

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Shaul  Migron

Prof. Shaul Migron

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Born 1930, Tel Aviv; Ph.D. 1985, Hebrew University; Research Fellow 1986; Associate Professor 1992; Emeritus 1996. Died in 2014.

Research interests included comparative ancient Indo-European, especially Indo-Iranian; Indo-European etymology; a renowned expert of Vedic, especially the Rgveda; Indo-European poetic language; parallels and possible contacts between ancient Indo-European and ancient Semitic poetry. 

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Prof. Anita Mittwoch

msanita@mscc.huji.ac.il

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Anita was born in 1926 in Berlin; the family moved to England in 1939. She had a BA and MA in classics from University of London.  Her MA was on the first book of Maccabees.She then worked in a bookstore, and taught Latin and classics in various highschools  in England.  She moved to Israel in 1963, where she began teaching English in the English department.  She returned to English to be with her ailing mother in 1968 and then enrolled in the PhD program in Linguistics (though it looks like she also considered studying psycholinguistics).  Her PhD is from 1971. Her research interests included the semantics of temporal expressions: aspect, adverbials of duration and frequency, tense; the Davidsonian theory of events, specifically as it affects the interpretation of adverbials and cognate object and of bare infinitivals.

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Yehuda  N. Falk

Prof. Yehuda N. Falk

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Born in New-York, 1958. Member of the Israeli Association for Theoretical Linguistics' and in the International Lexical-Functional Grammar Association. Professor of Linguistics at the English department since 1984, and then from 2008 at the Linguistics Department, Generative Track. Passed away in 2012.

Primary area of research interest is theoretical generative syntax with a typological orientation, in the theoretical framework of Lexical-Functional Grammar;  The nature of the basic elements of syntactic representation -- constituent structure and grammatical functions -- and the relation between them. Subjecthood, development of LFG analyses for various constructions in both English and Hebrew (auxiliaries, mixed categories, infinitives, etc.).

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Larissa Naiditch

Prof. Larissa Naiditch

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Ph.D.1978, Academy of Sciences, Institute of Linguistics, Leningrad, Russia.  1993 - 2015 : Researcher in the Department of Linguistics, The Faculty of Humanities, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem. Lecturer 1993; Senior Lecturer; Associate Professor 2006. 

Research interests include Germanistics (History and Dialectology of German; Phonology and Grammar of Germanic Languages (esp.: German Sprachinseln, Diachronic Phonology of German Dialects), Diachronic Linguistics, General Phonology (esp.: Structural Methods of Phonological Analysis; History of Structuralism), Languages in Contact (esp.: Code-Switching Models, Interference in Grammar and in Phonology, Russian Abroad, German Abroad; e.g., Russian in Israel, German in Russia), Folk Narratives (esp.: Linguistic Structures of Personal Narratives, Fairytales, and Charms), Poetics, Stylistics, Translation Theory, and Typology.

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Mori Rimon

Dr. Mori Rimon

rimon@huji.ac.il

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Dr. Mori Rimon is a part-time adjunct professor at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem and a member of the interdisciplinary Language, Logic and Cognition Center (LLCC). Mori is also a self-employed hi-tech consultant in areas of his expertise. His background includes R&D activities in hi-tech/IT companies, most notably in managerial and technical positions in IBM Research. Mori holds a PhD in Computer Science, an MSc in Mathematics and a BSc in Mathematics and Physics, all from the Hebrew University. Professional interests and teaching areas include computational linguistics, text analytics / NLP, machine learning and knowledge management (aka "big data" these days).

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Lea  Sawicki

Dr. Lea Sawicki

Lea.sawicki@mail.huji.ac.il

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Research areas:

Slavic languages. Baltic languages. Syntax of Polish, syntactic changes.Syntax of Lithuanian. Valency and syntactic dependency. Tense and Aspect. Textlinguistics. Narrative grammar. Dialogue structure.

 

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Ariel  Shisha-Halevy

Prof. Ariel Shisha-Halevy

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Born 1945, Haifa; Ph.D. 1973, Hebrew University of Jerusalem; Lecturer 1973; Senior Lecturer 1978; Associate Professor 1984; Professor 1987; Member of the Israel Academy of Sciences and Humanities. His research interests include Celtic grammar, especially the syntax of Irish and Modern and Middle Welsh, Egyptian and Coptic grammar, typological-comparative grammar, and text linguistics, especially narrative grammar.

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Ivy  Sichel

Dr. Ivy Sichel

isichel@ucsc.edu

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Ivy Sichel's work focuses on syntactic theory in its relatively recent developments within the Minimalist Program, and more specifically the syntax-semantics interface. She is interested in the syntactic contribution to meaning in all its aspects and has worked on a variety of empirical domains with this broad question in mind. These domains include the event properties of nominalizations, the structural decomposition of the meaning of POSSESSION, the effect of structure and movement on the interpretation of negative expressions, the interpretation of resumptive pronouns and ordinary pronouns, the propensity of demonstrative pronouns for deictic use, and in the domain of locality, the factors which enter into allowing selective extraction from relative clauses in some languages. She is also interested in the Sociolinguistics of the revival of Hebrew speech, and has written about women’s contribution to the revival project at the turn of the 20th century (with Miri Bar-Ziv Levi), and about the relationship between the revival and the establishment of the State of Israel (with Uri Mor).

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Moshe  Taube

Prof. Moshe Taube

+972 2 588 0061
moshe.taube@mail.huji.ac.il
Humanities, Office 6613

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Professor in the Dept of Linguistics and the Dept of German, Russian and East European Studies. Tamara and Saveli Grinberg Chair in Russian Studies.

 Research areas:

- Medieval East Slavic languages and literatures: Old Russian, Ruthenian (predecessor of modern Ukrainian and Belarusian), in particular the medieval translations from Hebrew into these languages. Slavonic Bible translations. Slavonic extra-canonical literature. The Old Russian Chronicles and Chronographs (universal historical compilations).

- Yiddish language and literature in all its aspects, in particular the syntax, semantics, pragmatics and phraseology of the written language of the 19th-20th centuries, but also earlier stages. The historical development of the language, its dialects, and its recent impoverishment among the ultra-orthodox speakers in Israel and the US. The impact of the co-territorial languages (Polish, Ukrainian and Belarusian) on the grammar and lexicon of Yiddish, and nowadays the impact of Modern Hebrew and English on the new spoken and written varieties of Yiddish, as well as the impact of Yiddish and Slavic on the syntax of Modern Hebrew.

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Yael  Ziv

Prof. Yael Ziv

+ 972 2 588 3973
yael.ziv@mail.huji.ac.il
Language Logic and Cognition Center Australia Compound, Office 211

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Yael Ziv's primary research areas are discourse/pragmatics, with specific interests in relevance theory, the syntax-pragmatics interface, information structure, discourse  markers and reference/anaphora.

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